Creative Gift Ideas for Co-workers!

Creative Co-Worker Gift Ideas from TheFrugalGirls.com

Need some fun and thrifty gift ideas for your co-workers?

Check out this BIG List of Creative Gift Ideas for Co-workers for some helpful suggestions!

See Also:
Christmas Gift Ideas at TheFrugalGirls.com

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28 Responses to Creative Gift Ideas for Co-workers!

  1. MamaNellie says:

    Head over to the dollar tree and pick up a pretty goblet, a pkg of hot cocoa, candy cane, curling ribbon, tissue paper and a gift bag. Tie a pretty bow with the curling ribbon or two on the goblet, fill with the cocoa and candy cane or other treats. carefully wrap in tissue paper and gift in the bag. You could do a set of goblets, depending on how much you wanted to gift.

  2. Cindy says:

    Cookies in a Jar. They are so cute, very little work or cost, you can make a dozen of them, decorate the jars, and the layering of ingredients is so cute! It’s homemade which gives a nice touch that you care and it’s something that’s relatively useful. I mean, really, who couldn’t use chocolate chip cookie mix???

  3. Bridget Soyars says:

    There are lots of great way to let co-workers know that you appreciate them, especially at the holidays. The easies (and probably least expensive) is with baked goods. This is also especially nice because they can share it with their family and friends…so the gift keeps on giving. Add a card with a personal note too. Depending on how many co-workers you are including, cookies, brownies, mini pound cakes, bread and candy can work. If it’s just a couple of co-workers, why not try doing a 1 dish meal for each of them to take home? Maybe a lasagna, pasta with meatballs, soup, casserole or the like. People always appreciate getting food, especially when they are busy with all the holiday happenings. Merry Christmas to you and yours!

  4. Jayme says:

    I always made or purchased ornaments for my co-workers and arranged the gift on a small tray of home made goodies. I could usually get the ornaments for 50% off at Hobby Lobby and a pretty charger plate for the goodies for less than $1 each. Wrap it all up in cellophane and curling ribbon. Looks pretty and easily less than $5 each.

  5. Kim Killoy says:

    A nice mug full of chocolates or hard candies or both. Or use the mug and fill it with homemade cookies wrapped it all in cellophane and beautiful bow. Another friend suggested use the mug but put a scarf inside the mug! Walmart has mugs for $1 and scarves for $5…quick and cute and you took the time to put some thought into it! : )

  6. Gramma Rocks says:

    I like MamaNellie’s idea :)

    I would go to a craft store that sells fleece (JoAnn’s is where I go) and purchase a 1/4 yard per person, cut it the size you want, I use 70 inches, cut at set intervals 5 inches on either side for fringe and you have a cute gift. OR you can try to battle the sure-to-be-there crowds at Old Navy this Saturday when they have their Performance Fleece Scarves for just a $1. But making your own allows you to pick the fabric you like and is handmade<3

  7. Jamie says:

    When I worked I had roughly 6 girls to buy for so I always had to make it thrifty. In the past I have given coffee mugs (from dollar tree) with hot chocolate packets, gloves with lotion, makeup bag (dollar tree) with a bottle of nail polish and pretty colored finger nail file, pretty stationery with a colored pin. I have done many more, but these are the better ones. I hope this helps. Merry Christmas!

  8. cyndi says:

    one of the little things i do is make a big batch of candy (this year its peanut brittle) and put some it goody bags for each person.

  9. Lynn says:

    I’m trying to make some hand lotions and scrubs, bath salts and who-knows-what else. Re-using baby food jars, packaging in handmade fabric bags. Hopefully I’m successful!

  10. Cris says:

    How about volunteering in their name at an organization? Make pretty holiday cards with a card inside that says:
    I would like to give an 1 hour of my time at a charity or organization of your choice. Please fill out this card and return it to me by Jan. 15th
    Or how about instead of giving gifts to everyone take up a collection to be given in everyone’s name to a deserving organization?

    Just some non-cluttering, frugal ideas.

  11. Jenny Torres says:

    Small Christmas gift bags, fill them with a variety of candy, tie them with a bow and place them into a coffee mug with a Christmas gift tag with their name on it. This can all be found at the Dollar Tree/ 99 Cent store. You can add a card to them as well or put hot chocolate packets or coffee packets in the bags too.

  12. Susie Tanner says:

    I make homemade hot fudge that you warm up and pour over ice cream. I put them in a 1/2 pint size mason jars. I cut a piece of Chistams fabric in a square with pinking shears, lay it on top and screw the top on. It is so yummy!

  13. Allison Thompson says:

    I know it’s probably a little late in the season this year but for future reference…..Pampered Chef always has a dollar cookbook in their catalog so I like to get a bunch to hand out at Christmas. It’s a very practical gift.

  14. michelle says:

    buy a pack of canning jars and christmas candy. 1 yard of christmas colored $1 per yard fabric, christmas colored pipe cleaners. fill jar with candy, cut out a circle of fabric at least an inch bigger than jar lid, put the sealing piece on fabric on, then the screw top.wrap pipe cleaners around the top and twist a couple times make it look like ribbon strings hanging down. u can write on fabric with fab pen or use the canning stickers that come with the jars.

  15. Maura says:

    I am a SAHM so I don’t have coworkers but with 2 kids in school I have about 12 teachers I buy for. I keep a list of who I need to buy for and through out the year when I find items that are cute and have a great price I pick them up. This year I am giving big jar candles from Michaels they were normally around $10 but they were clearanced and got them for .42 each. So the key is to keep your eyes opened and plan in advance how many you need to buy for. My mom who worked with 12 women would shop the year before during the Christmas Clearance and put the items away till the next year. They had a set dollar amount and all the woman were amazed at everything my mom bought them! After Christmas is also the time to stock up on tissue paper and gift bags, so you have them ready for next year.

  16. Jane says:

    My boss used to buy us some fannie may chocolates. Little six piece boxes. Yeah- cheap. LOL. One coworker would buy us Christmas decorations from the dollar store for our desk so we could decorate. And then another coworker would give us a Christmas card with lotto tickets in it (Scratch off kind)
    Otherwise we would have a Christmas lunch where we would do a Christmas steal exchange thing where you buy a $20 gift and everyone picks numbers. First person goes first and takes pick of gifts and 2nd person can get a new one or pick what the first person had. And so on and so on. No one opens til the end. That way we wouldn’t have to buy presents for everyone. Each person would get a $20 gift or so.

  17. Janice says:

    I work in an office of about 30 people. We previously gave each other trivial Christmas gifts, but 5 yrs ago decided instead to have a group food drive for a local food bank in lieu of gifts. Everyone spends the same amount they used to spend on co-worker gifts.

    If I was giving co-worker gifts, I LOVE these hot cocoa jars. So pretty http://www.elizabethannedesigns.com/blog/2009/04/06/diy-wedding-details-hot-cocoa-and-marshmellows/

    I am making reusable shopping bags for co-worker birthdays this year. There are many good tutorials online and if you get the fabric on sale, they’ll only cost you a few dollars. I’ve been using designer decorator fabric from Joann’s.

  18. Alison says:

    Some gifts I received from coworkers were a nice bottle of wine, a set of cookie cutters, bath and body works lotions, candles and reed diffusers. All can be inexpensive if you know where to shop. :)

  19. mycaricature says:

    I buy rod pretzels, melt chocolate over them and add sprinkles. Looks fancy as can be and costs ~$5 to make 30-40 large pretzels (or 60-80 if you are like us and break them neatly in half.)

  20. Teresa says:

    I picked up one of those cardboard sleeves that you get at Starbucks for when your drink is too hot … I plan on using it as a pattern to make reusable sleeves for my co-workers. It doesn’t take much fabric, so I can probably use scraps that I already have or pick up remnants at the fabric store. Its inexpensive, individual, handmade, and better for the environment! :o)

    • Natalie says:

      These would be especially great made with felted or boiled wool! Wool is an excellent insulator and it looks really nice. You don;t need to finish the edges either. A good source of wool is wool sweaters from thrift stores, especially when they have a dollar day or other sale day. Be sure to get sweaters that are 100% wool so they felt well. I usually take the sweater apart before I felt it because that way the edges are already finished. Then I just wash the sweater pieces in hot hot water with a cold rinse. I use any kind of soap, though a lot of people prefer to use an olive oil based soap that they grate into the washing machine. Honestly I don’t think it matters though. Once felted I then dry in the dryer until bone dry. If the pieces have curled up I spritz with water and iron with a dry iron. The use you template to cut out your cup ‘mittens’. You could either sew up one seam, or use a couple of cool buttons. Again, felt doesn’t need to have edges finished, so for button hoes, a simple slit will do. Of course, you can reinforce them if you want to, but I think it’s an extra step that isn’t necessary. LOL now I’ thinking I may want to do this for MY coworkers!

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